Walk-in Centres vs GP-led Health Centres

Posted on January 5, 2010. Filed under: GP-led health centres | Tags: , |

Department of Health | accessed 5 January 2010

Walk-in Centres

NHS Walk-in Centres (WiCs) are predominantly nurse-led first contact services which offer access to treatment and advice without requiring patients to register or make an appointment. NHS WiCs deal with illnesses and injuries – including infections and rashes, fractures and lacerations, emergency contraception and advice, stomach upsets, cuts and bruises, or minor burns and strains – without an appointment. They are not designed for treating long-term conditions or immediately life-threatening problems. Some NHS WiCs offer access to doctors as well as nurses. They are complementary to traditional GP practices, out-of-hours and A&E services.

Most NHS WiCs are open 365 days a year from 7am to 10pm, Monday to Friday, 9am to 10pm Saturday and Sunday. Some are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Hours vary to meet local circumstances.

The first WiC opened in January 2000 and there are now over 90 in England, seeing nearly three million patients per year.

GP health centres

The NHS Next Stage Review Interim Report, Our NHS, Our Future (October 2007) gave a commitment to establish over 100 new GP practices in areas where they are most needed, and 150 GP-led health centres.

Following the 2007 Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR), the Secretary of State for Health announced on 10 October a £250 million access fund to support delivery of new GP services.

The Operating Framework for 2008-09 set a national priority for all PCTs to complete procurements based on open and transparent tenders for new GP-led health centres, and those PCTs identified as having the greatest health need to procure new GP practices.

The Operating Framework for 2009-10 asked PCTs to ensure that there is timely implementation of these new services, including effective communications with the public, so that patients can benefit as soon as possible from improved access and choice. Most services will open to patients in 2009.

Each health centre will be open from 8am until 8pm, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. It will offer bookable appointments and walk-in services for any member of the public; patients can attend the service, either by appointment or on a walk-in basis, while remaining registered elsewhere, or they may choose to register at a centre if it is more convenient than their existing practice.

The first GP health centre was opened by Alan Johnson in Bradford on 1 November 2008; services open are proving popular with the public especially on weekends when traditionally GP practices are closed.

The 152 new GP health centres will more than double the number of walk-in services available in England and deliver more than 2.5 million new GP appointments each year, together with many more appointments with nurses and other staff, and provide more choice and flexibility for patients in how and when they access care.

The 112 practices are being procured in those areas of the country with fewest GPs and greatest health needs, providing more capacity in primary care, and more choice for patients in the most deprived areas of where and when they can access GP services. The PCTs were identified using a balanced range of indicators of local health need and deprivation.

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Out-of-Hours

Posted on July 28, 2009. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , |

NHS Choices | accessed on 28 July 2009

Since 2004, GPs have been able to choose whether or not to provide 24-hour care for their patients.

The out-of-hours (OOH) period is from 6.30pm to 8.00am on weekdays and all day at weekends and bank holidays.

Currently, some GP surgeries deal with OOH services themselves as well as having normal surgery hours. Some surgeries work together so that the GPs from more than one surgery can take turns to provide care. Other surgeries pay private companies to give care on their behalf at certain times. This may be for OOH treatment or when surgeries are closed for another reason.

Primary care trusts (PCTs) are local healthcare organisations that are responsible for making sure that all patients get OOH care. Some PCTs may decide to provide the care themselves, while others might hire other organisations to do it. This means that each area may have a slightly different service.

You can contact your local PCT to find out how you can access OOH care in your area.

Since January 2005, all providers of OOH care have had to comply with national OOH quality requirements. These state that details of all OOH care must be sent to the surgery where the patient is registered by 8.00am on the next working day. OOH providers must have a complaints procedure consistent with the NHS complaints procedure.

Types of out-of-hours care

OOH cover may include some or all of the options below:

  • GPs working in A&E departments, NHS walk-in centres or minor injury units (MIUs),
  • teams of healthcare professionals working in places such as primary care centres, A&E, MIUs or NHS walk-in centres,
  • healthcare professionals (other than doctors) giving home visits after a detailed clinical assessment, and
  • ambulance services moving patients to places where they can be seen by a doctor or a nurse in order to reduce the need for home visits.

Telephone consultations and triage (assessment of how urgent your medical problem is) are an important part of all OOH care. NHS Direct is the national 24-hour phone service, on 0845 4647, giving health information and professional healthcare advice.

For the Department of Health’s Comprehensive information on a range of out-of-hours topics including categorised policy documents, non-clinical guidance, links, and other resources click here

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Alternative Providers of Medical Services (APMS)

Posted on July 15, 2009. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , |

Department of Health – last accessed on 15 July 2009

Alternative Provider Medical Services (APMS) is a contractual route through which PCTs can contract with a wide range of providers to deliver services tailored to local needs.

It offers substantial opportunities for the restructuring of services to offer greater patient choice, improved access and greater responsiveness to the specific needs of the community. It will provide a valuable tool to address need in areas of historic under-provision, enable re-provision of services where practices opt out, and improve access in areas with problems with GP recruitment and retention.

What is APMS and why was it introduced?

Why was APMS introduced?

Alternative Provider Medical Services (APMS) is a contractual route through which PCTs can contract with a wide range of providers to deliver services tailored to local needs. It was introduced to allow PCTs to make arrangements outside of the established contracting routes with additional providers.

What services can be provided under APMS?

APMS can be used to provide essential services, additional services where GMS/PMS practices opt out, enhanced services, out-of-hours services or any one element or combination of these services.

How does APMS differ from the other routes?

Under APMS, PCTs are able to contract for primary medical services with commercial providers, voluntary sector providers, mutual sector providers, social enterprises, public service bodies, GMS and PMS practices (through a separate APMS contract) and NHS Trusts and NHS Foundation Trusts.

Does APMS mean privatisation of the NHS?

No. APMS is just a contractual route to deliver NHS services. Regardless of the type of provider, the NHS remains free at the point of delivery.

Can APMS be used for children’s services/drug or alcohol services/mental health services/sexual health services/complementary health services?

It is for PCTs to determine the health needs of their populations and to commission or provide services. Services such as those described can be provided using any of the contracting routes, including APMS, as long as the services are primary medical services.

How is an APMS contract regulated?

The APMS Directions 2006 set out mandatory requirements, but also allow extensive flexibility. APMS gives PCTs considerable discretion to shape locally appropriate services responsive to the needs of the community. A ‘model’ APMS contract is available through the link to EAPMC below and can be used as a guide for local APMS contracts.

Equitable Access to Primary Medical Care (EAPMC)

 

Standards, regulations and pensions

What factors apply to APMS contracts?

  •  The APMS Directions place a duty on the PCT to set out various clauses in each APMS contract.  These apply to:
  1. basic requirements: who can be patients, the services to be provided, circumstances in which the contract can be terminated or sanctioned;
  2. common standards with PMS: provisions equivalent to the PMS regulations, including premises, GP appraisal and assessment, clinical governance, confidentiality, inspection by the Healthcare Commission;
  3. extra requirements: covering dispute resolution, additional restraints on prescribing, qualification of staff;
  4. requirements applicable to essential services (where these are provided under the APMS contract)
  • Why is APMS regulated at all?

The APMS Directions have been designed to ensure quality standards across all contracting routes, and so that minimum statutory requirements apply across the board.

What standards do APMS providers have to meet and how are these enforced?

PCT service specifications should include requirements across all dimensions of performance, and state what performance standards will be applied, including NHS and local performance management standards. These should be incorporated into the contract between the PCT and provider.

What is the difference between APMS and a Service Level Agreement (SLA)?

An SLA is not an enforceable contract. Under an SLA, where the two bodies involved in the agreement are health service bodies, the contract will be an NHS contract which is not enforceable at law, and where disputes will be dealt with via the NHS Dispute Resolution Procedure. APMS contracts with private and voluntary organisations which are not health service bodies set out legally enforceable provisions, including safeguards for patients, and, since the contract is not an NHS contract, appropriate mechanisms for resolving disputes and breaches of contracts.

How are APMS contracts paid for?

This is for PCTs to determine, using the PCT’s unified budget.

How much will APMS contracts cost?

This is for agreement between the PCT and provider. As with all contracts, APMS contracts should seek to balance outputs against value for money.

Can GMS and PMS practices provide APMS services?

Yes. PCTs can contract with GMS and PMS practices through the APMS route. The practice would hold a separate APMS contract alongside their existing GMS/PMS contract.

Are APMS arrangements pensionable under the NHS Pension Scheme?

The NHS Pensions Regulations enable APMS contactors and their staff to be eligible to remain in, or join, the main NHS Pension Scheme providing the APMS contractor also meets the eligibility criteria for the provision of GMS or PMS. For pension purposes, staff will be treated as practice staff. As members of the main NHS Pension Scheme, practice staff are entitled to retirement benefits. However, they are not entitled to the separate but related benefits in respect of injury, early payment or extra service on the redundancy or Voluntary Early Retirement with the employer’s consent (where the employer agrees to meet the cost so the pension is not reduced).

If the APMS Provider is a NHS Trust or a Foundation Trust then the staff will have the same pension rights as other NHS Trust or Foundation Trust employees.

The eligibility criteria for providing GMS are section 28S of the NHS Act 1977. The eligibility criteria for PMS are in section 28D of the Act – set out in the Annex to this note.

APMS contractors who do not meet the eligibility criteria for the provision of GMS or PMS will not be eligible to remain in, or join, the NHS Pension Scheme.

How many PCTs are currently using APMS?

The Department does not collect or hold this information. We do know that many PCTs in England are contracting for out-of-hours services under the APMS route and there is much interest in the wider opportunities presented by APMS.

The Department has been supporting six PCTs with the procurement of alternative providers.

Do PCTs need to tender for APMS contract?

Any decision to place a tender for primary medical services provision is a matter for the commissioning PCT. In reaching a decision the PCT will need to meet DH procurement guidelines and would also be expected to seek its own legal advice.

While PCTs will be aware that health services are not covered in full by the EC Directive on the procurement of services they may, as good practice to ensure delivery of high clinical standards and good value for money services, seek to test the market via the procurement process.

Can pharmacy, dental or optometry services be provided under an APMS contract?

No. APMS is for the provision of primary medical services.

What is the difference between APMS and SPMS?

Specialist PMS (SPMS) is a PMS model of delivery that does not require the provider to have a registered list of patients, the involvement of a GP or the provision of essential primary care services. What makes SPMS different is that it can only be provided by those who would otherwise qualify to hold a PMS agreement, as in Section 28D of the 1977 Act and Part 2 of the PMS Regulations.

How do PCTs procure services using APMS?

NHS PASA have produced an APMS Procurement Toolkit  to support PCTs in the procurement process, available on NHS PASA’s website. The toolkit gives advice on developing service specifications, advertising, tendering, evaluating applications, project managing contracts, and monitoring outputs.

NHS Purchasing and Supply Agency (opens new window)

 

What other help is available to support APMS development?

The Department of Health has issued Directions and guidance. For general guidance on contracting and commissioning, see links below.

The National Primary Care Collaborative (NPCC) supports PCTs in 28 pilot sites to develop an integrated approach to primary care commissioning, using all contracting routes. Further details are on the Improvement Foundation website

Commissioning Friend (opens new window)

 

Primary care contracting (opens new window)

 

Improvement Foundation: Practice-based commissioning development programme (opens new window)

 

Eligibility of contractors

This is an extract from the Health and Social Care (Community and Health Standards Act) 2003. Anyone entering into a contract for the provision of primary medical services is advised to take legal advice.

‘(1) A Primary Care Trust or Local Health Board may, subject to such conditions as may be prescribed, enter into a general medical services contract with:

(a) a medical practitioner;

(b) two or more individuals practising in partnership where the conditions in subsection (2) are satisfied; or

(c) a company limited by shares where the conditions in subsection (3) are satisfied

(2) The conditions referred to in subsection (1)(b) in relation to a partnership are that-

(a) at least one partner is a medical practitioner; and

(b) any partner who is not a medical practitioner is either-

    (i) an  NHS employee;

    (ii) a section 28C employee, section 17C employee or Article 15B employee;

    (iii) a health care professional who is engaged in the  provision of services under this Act; or

    (iv) an individual falling within section 28D(1)(bc) above.

(3) The conditions referred to in subsection (1) (c) in relation to a company are that-

    (a) at least one share in the company is legally and beneficially owned by a medical practitioner; and

    (b) any share which is not so owned is legally and beneficially owned by a person referred to in subsection (2) (b) (i) to (iv).

(4) Regulations may make provision as to the effect, in  relation to ageneral medical services contract entered into by individuals practising in partnership, of a change in the membership of the partnership.

(5) In this section:

       ‘health care professional’ has the same meaning as in section 28M above; ‘NHS employee’, section 28C employee’, ‘section 17C employee’ have the same meaning as in section 28D above.

 

Section 28D of the 1977 Act  (Persons with whom PMS agreements may be made)

This is an extract from the Health and Social Care (Community and Health Standards Act) 2003 and is provided for information. Anyone entering into a contract for the provision of primary medical services is advised to take legal advice.

‘(1)   A Strategic Health Authority or a Health Authority may make an agreement under section 28C (personal medical or dental services) only with one or more of the following:

    (a)    an NHS trust or NHS foundation trust;

    (b)   a medical practitioner who meets the prescribed conditions;

    (ba)    a dental practitioner who meets the prescribed conditions;

    (bb)    a health care professional who meets the prescribed conditions;

    (bc)    an individual who is providing services:

        (i)   under a general medical services contract  
        (ii)   in accordance with section 28C arrangements, section 17C arrangements or Article 15B arrangements; or 
        (iii) under section 35 of this Act, section 17J or 25 of the 1978 Act or Article 56 or 61 of the Health and Personal Social Services (Northern Ireland) Order 1972 (1972 No 1256 (NI 14)); or has so                provided them within such period as may be  prescribed;

(d)  an NHS employee, a section 28C employee, a section 17C employee or an Article 15B employee;

(e)  a qualifying body;

(f)   a Primary Care Trust or Local Health Board.

(1A)   The power under subsection (1) to make an agreement with a person falling within paragraph (bc) or (d) of that subsection is subject to such conditions as may be prescribed.

(2)   In this section –

‘the 1978 Act’ means the National Health Service (Scotland) Act 1978;

‘Article 15B arrangements’ means arrangements for the provision of services made under Article 15B of the Health and Personal Social Services (Northern Ireland) Order 1972 (1972 No 1256 (NI 14));

“Article 15B employee’ means an individual who, in connection with the provision of services in accordance with Article 15B arrangements, is employed by a person providing or performing those services;

‘health care professional’ means a person who is a member of a profession regulated by a body mentioned (at the time the agreement in question is made) in section 25(3) of the National Health Service Reform and Health Care Professions Act 2002;

‘NHS employee’ means an individual who, in connection with the provision of services in the health service in England and Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland, is employed by

(a)   an NHS trust, an NHS foundation trust or (in Northern Ireland) a Health and Social Services Trust;

(b)   a Primary Care Trust or Local Health Board;

(c)   a person who is providing services under a general medical services contract;

(cc)   a dental practitioner whose name is included in a list prepared in accordance with regulations made under section 36(1)(a);

(d) an individual who is providing services as specified in subsection (1)(bc)(iii) above;

‘qualifying body’ means:

(a)   a company which is limited by shares all of which are legally and beneficially owned by persons falling within paragraph (a), (b), (ba), (bb), (bc), (d) or (f) of subsection (1); and also

(b)   in the case of an agreement under which primary dental services are provided, a body corporate which, in accordance with the provisions of Part IV of the Dentists Act 1984, is entitled to carry on the business of dentistry;

‘section 17C arrangements’ means arrangements for the provision of services made under section 17C of the 1978 Act;

‘section 17C employee’ means an individual who, in connection with the provision of services in accordance with section 17C arrangements, is employed by a person providing or performing those services;

‘section 28C arrangements’ means arrangements for the provision of services made under section 28C; and

‘section 28C employee’ means an individual who, in connection with the provision of services in accordance with section 28C arrangements, is employed by a person providing or performing those services.

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The Framework for procuring External Support for Commissioners (FESC): a practical guide

Posted on June 14, 2009. Filed under: FESC, Reports/papers | Tags: |

Department of Health | Leaflet | 12 June 2009

FESC is a practical and cost effective procurement tool to help primary care trusts (PCTs) address gaps in commissioning capability or capacity by providing easy access to high quality commissioning solutions from pre-qualified and experienced private sector partners. This brochure sets out what FESC is, why you should consider using it and how to do so.

Download The Framework for procuring External Support for Commissioners (FESC): a practical guide (PDF, 1106K)

he Framework for procuring External Support for Commissioners (FESC) has been established to provide practical support to PCTs as they work to develop their commissioning skills and move towards being world class. It is a practical, easy to use and cost effective procurement tool available to all PCTs, to help address gaps in their commissioning capability or capacity.
FESC is a route to accessing thirteen independent sector organisations that have been selected as ideal partners to work with PCTs. All thirteen qualified to be on the Framework following a rigorous due diligence and selection process run by the Department of Health. Each organisation has tried and proven commissioning skills; some offer the full breadth of skills across the commissioning spectrum, while others are specialists in specific aspects of commissioning. These organisations can support you on all areas from better assessing need to managing performance and undertaking service redesign.
FESC will deliver commissioning solutions, rather than traditional consultancy services. The business model is based around developing medium to long term relationships which can provide PCTs with vital specialist knowledge and experience.
For these reasons, FESC is different to Catalist and other conventional procurement routes, which NHS organisations have traditionally used for buying consultancy services. FESC is the only framework in place that has the sole objective of enhancing core commissioning skills across the NHS.
With the Framework already in place, FESC will enable you to move straight to procuring the services you need within a competitive environment, allowing you to focus on the task at hand without getting caught up in costly and lengthy procurement processes.

What is FESC?

The Framework for procuring External Support for Commissioners (FESC) has been established to provide practical support to PCTs as they work to develop their commissioning skills and move towards being world class. It is a practical, easy to use and cost effective procurement tool available to all PCTs, to help address gaps in their commissioning capability or capacity.

FESC is a route to accessing thirteen independent sector organisations that have been selected as ideal partners to work with PCTs. All thirteen qualified to be on the Framework following a rigorous due diligence and selection process run by the Department of Health. Each organisation has tried and proven commissioning skills; some offer the full breadth of skills across the commissioning spectrum, while others are specialists in specific aspects of commissioning. These organisations can support you on all areas from better assessing need to managing performance and undertaking service redesign.

FESC will deliver commissioning solutions, rather than traditional consultancy services. The business model is based around developing medium to long term relationships which can provide PCTs with vital specialist knowledge and experience.

For these reasons, FESC is different to Catalist and other conventional procurement routes, which NHS organisations have traditionally used for buying consultancy services. FESC is the only framework in place that has the sole objective of enhancing core commissioning skills across the NHS.

With the Framework already in place, FESC will enable you to move straight to procuring the services you need within a competitive environment, allowing you to focus on the task at hand without getting caught up in costly and lengthy procurement processes.

What range of commissioning solutions can you buy from FESC?

The framework is organised into four categories:

• Assessment and Planning e.g. Health Needs Assessments

• Contracting and Performance e.g. Robust contract negotiation processes

• Performance management, settlement & review e.g. Acute invoice validation

• Patient and public engagement e.g. PCT prospectus

Who are the suppliers?

• Aetna

• AXA PPP

• Bupa Health Dialog

• Partners in Commissioning

• Dr Foster

• Humana

• KPMG

• McKesson

• McKinsey

• Navigant

• Tribal

• United Health UK

• WG Consulting

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About NHS LIFT

Posted on June 8, 2009. Filed under: LIFT | Tags: |

Department of Health | Last modified 9 February 2007

NHS LIFT is a vehicle for improving and developing frontline primary and community care facilities. It is allowing PCTs to invest in new premises in new locations, not merely reproduce existing types of service. It is providing patients with modern integrated health services in high quality, fit for purpose primary care premises.

NHS LIFT is flexible in respect of the type of buildings it provides. The approach does not provide a building into which you put your services. Rather it allows the building design to reflect the needs of the services. To date LIFT is providing a range of building types including re-provision of GP premises, one stop primary care centres, integrated health and local authority service centres, and community hospitals.

The one-stop-shop principle is an important component of NHS LIFT – allowing the patient to be treated in their locality in so-called ‘One-Stop-Centres’ or Primary Care Centres that are modern, convenient, easy to access and staffed by a wide range of healthcare professionals.

‘These new super surgeries will provide some of the most modern family doctor facilities anywhere in the country. NHS patients will be able to access a wide range of services right on their doorsteps, all under one roof.

‘It’s the largest and most sustained programmes of modernisation of primary care premises in the history of the NHS.

‘This Government is determined to tackle health inequalities. These surgeries target new resources to the poorest communities.

‘The fantastic new facilities will also help attract some of the finest GPs to Britain’s deprived areas where they are most needed.’

The former Secretary State for Health The Rt Hon John Reid speaking at the opening of the first LIFT building – The Centre, Manor Park, Newham – 26th November 2004.

Background

Of all patient contact with the NHS, the overwhelming majority – about 90% – occur in general practice. A survey of primary care in inner cities, revealed that many of the deprived urban areas, where health need is greatest, suffer from a disproportionately high number of sub-standard premises.

The condition and functionality of the existing primary care estate is variable with current facilities not always meeting patients expectations, with quality and access often being below an acceptable standard. Consequently, service development is sometimes severely hampered by the limitations of the premises.

Survey data shows that:

  • only 40% of primary care premises are purpose built;
  • almost half are either adapted residential buildings or converted shops;
  • less than 5% of GP’s premises are co-located with pharmacy and around the same proportion are co-located with social services;
  • around 80% are below the recommended size

Investment in primary health and social care facilities, particularly in inner city areas, is a key Government priority – it is clear that new buildings are required to provide people with modern integrated primary care services.

Currently investment in new facilities tends to be fragmented and piecemeal. In addition, the private sector has found the primary care market a difficult one in which to operate and develop and too many of the developments had tended to be small-scale and focussed in the more affluent areas.

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Social enterprise

Posted on April 22, 2009. Filed under: Social enterprise | Tags: |

Health Management Specialist Library | accessed 22 April 2009

Definition

‘Social enterprises are businesses that deliver goods and services but in pursuit of primarily social objectives.  The government is committed to supporting social enterprise in the economy at large and in its recent White Paper has suggested that social enterprise models of service delivery can be part of the provider market in primary and community care.’ (1)

‘3.43 We will ensure that both new and existing providers are allowed to provide services in underserved areas.  Social enterprises, the voluntary sector and independent sector providers will all make valuable contributions in the longstanding challenge of addressing inequalities.  The voluntary and community sectors often have strengths and experience in delivering services to those people who are not well served by traditional services.  This will be the basis of the New Fairness in Primary Care procurement principles.’ (2)

‘From April 2007, the Department [of Health] is holding a Social Enterprise Investment Fund (SEIF) of £73 million over a four year period. Of this £73 million, there will be £1.2 million revenue and £8.9 million capital money in the financial year 2007 to 2008.  Both social enterprise pathfinders and other social enterprises, delivering health and social care services, will be able to apply to the SEIF in the financial year 2007 to 2008.'(3)

References

1. Lewis R, Hunt P, Carson D, 2006, Social enterprise and community-based care: is there a future for mutually owned organisations in community and primary care? King’s Fund, London.

2. Department of Health, 2006, Our health, our care, our say: a new direction for community services, The Stationery Office, Norwich

3. Department of Health, 2007, The Social Enterprise Investment Fund

Social Enterprise Magazine

About us | accessed 1 June 2009

Social Enterprise aims to be the most engaging, informative and useful resource for business people who are passionate about changing lives, building communities and nurturing the environment. It is published by London Fields Publishing Ltd, a joint venture between Society Media and Glock Design.

Through our monthly magazine and daily online news, our mission is to bring together the huge range of individuals and organisations in the social enterprise movement in a space where they can learn about and inspire one another – and tell the rest of the world what they’re missing.

We will be telling your stories, uncovering the news, expressing controversial opinions, digging deep into the big issues, leading debate and setting agendas. Our team of journalists and expert contributors will be doing all of this with the same spirit and passion that gives the social enterprise movement itself such a strong voice.

Links

  • Active Communities Directorate
    The Active Communities Directorate is part of the UK government’s Home Office department. It contributes to the delivery of Home Office Aim 7: “To support strong and active communities in which people of all races and backgrounds are valued and participate on equal terms by developing social policy to build a fair, prosperous and cohesive society in which everyone has a stake and to ensure that active citizenship contributes to the enhancement of democracy and the development of civil society.”

  • Buckinghamshire & Milton Keynes Social Enterprise Network (BMKSEN)
    The social enterprise network for Buckinghamshire and Milton Keynes.

  • Business in the Community (BITC)
    UK based charity with over 400 employees which aims to promote CSR related concepts within business. Site offers a variety of publications and resources. The organisation also produces CSR indices. ranking companies according to CSR related criteria.

  • Business Link for London
    London’s government-sponsored business support agency.

  • CAN (Community Action Network)
    UK support network for social entrepreneurs.

  • CDFA (Community Development Finance Association)
    The trade association for Community Development Finance Institutions (CDFIs).

  • Co-operatives UK 
    Based in Manchester this membership organisation aims to promote co-operative and mutual solutions, and work in partnership with its members to build a strong and successful co-operative movement.

  • Development Trusts Association
    Community regeneration network and national body for development trusts.

  • ELBA (East London Business Alliance)
    Aims to bring the resources of the private sector to help build the capacity of local organisations and regeneration programmes in East London.

  • Futurebuilders
    Futurebuilders England is the government-backed £125m investment fund providing a combination of loans, grants and capacity-building support for voluntary and community organisations that deliver public services.

  • Global Links Initiative
    Global Links Initiative is a non-profit organisation which aims to support positive and creative action on social inclusion and citizen empowerment worldwide. Using information technology as an enabler, Global Links Initiative aims to foster practical links among socially entrepreneurial people around the world as well as promoting partnership with government and business.

  • i-genius
    i-genius is a world community of social entrepreneurs and seeks to inspire a new generation of social innovators.

  • InterChange Legal Advisory Service 
    Provides legal advice and assistance to charities and voluntary organisations that want to set up as charities.

  • InventorResource
    A public interest website focused on design, patent, legal, business plan and funding advice for inventors.

  • NCVO (National Council for Voluntary Organisations) 
    Aims to be the national representative body for voluntary groups.

  • Nearbuyou
    Nearbuyou is a national (UK) social trading network. It enables social enterprises to promote their organisation, advertise their products and services and find business opportunities.

  • NEF (New Economics Foundation) 
    A London based research and campaigning organisation. It states that it aims “to improve quality of life by promoting innovative solutions that challenge mainstream thinking on economic, environment and social issues.”

  • New Start
    New Start Publishing Ltd

  • Newham Chamber of Commerce
    The Chamber of Commerce for the London Borough of Newham.

  • Newham Council 
    The local council for the London Borough of Newham.

  • Newham Voluntary Sector Consortium
    This organisation aims to support voluntary, faith and community groups in Newham by helping them become effectively involved in local issues and services.

  • Planning Aid for London
    Aims to provide affordable town planning advice and training to individuals, local groups and local businesses in London.

  • School for Social Entrepreneurs 
    Runs UK-wide training programmes for social entrepreneurs.

  • Small Business Service 
    The government’s national support service for small and medium sized businesses.

  • Social Enterprise Ambassadors
    Twenty-five innovative entrepreneurs across England have been named as social enterprise ambassadors, including Chris Allwood, whose company ‘Auction My Stuff’ enables young unemployed people to learn about business through eBay, GP Sam Everington, and serial entrepreneur Kresse Wesling, whose latest business sells bags made from recycled fire-hose.

  • Social Enterprise Coalition
    Aims to be the national ‘voice’ and representative body for social enterprises. It is based in London.

  • Social Enterprise London (SEL)
    Aims to be the regional voice and representative body for social enterprises based in London.

  • Social Enterprise Unit
    The government’s cross-departmental support unit for the national social enterprise sector. It is based at the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) in London.

  • Social Firms UK
    Aims to be the national representative body for social firms.

  • Society Media
    Specialist editors, writers, designers and contract publishers for the social, public, charity and socially responsible corporate sectors.

  • Thames Gateway Technology Centre @ the University of East London (UEL)
    Aims to provide a gateway for local organisations to access the expertise and facilities of UEL. The University of East London is located in Newham at several campus sites. The Thames Gateway Technology Centre is located at the main site which is adjacent to the Cyprus Docklands Light Railway station.

  • The Centre for Strategy and Communication
    We specialise in three areas: communication training, management training and administration training. Our training programmes range from one-day high impact training to in-depth management development programmes.

  • UnLtd
    A foundation for social entrepreneurs – a charitable organisation offering grants and other support to would-be social entrepreneurs nationally.

  • You in Business
    You in Business is an innovative web portal, supporting aspirational women in business. As part of an ESF-funded EQUAL Diversity in Practice Project, You in Business has been developed by a partnership of Exemplas, everywoman and Bank of Scotland Corporate, and provides free eMentoring, eLearning and online self-assessments, as well as an extensive and comprehensive range of business tools, information, expertise and advice, enabling women to realise the business benefits of their personal attributes.

 

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Independent sector providers (primary care)

Posted on April 22, 2009. Filed under: ISTC | Tags: |

Health Management Specialist Library | accessed 22 April 2009

Definition

‘3.43 We will ensure that both new and existing providers are allowed to provide services in underserved areas. Social enterprises, the voluntary sector and independent sector providers will all make valuable contributions in the longstanding challenge of addressing inequalities.’ (1)

‘Patients living in deprived areas should soon find it easier to get a doctor’s appointment following the launch of a Government drive to find extra GPs and nurses for those towns and cities with the fewest family doctors…

‘New services expected to open are extra family practices, walk-in centres and minor injuries units…The contracts for the new services will run for an initial five years, with the potential to extend for longer.

‘The ‘Fairness in Primary Care Procurement’ programme is expected to provide patients with better access to a family doctor and more choice of GP, including flexible opening hours and extended services, such as minor surgery…

‘Over the coming months, the department will work with further PCTs with the fewest GPs for their populations, as identified in the white paper, as well as other relatively under-doctored or Spearhead PCTs, to invite new providers to deliver extra local services.

‘The programme aims to attract a broad range of providers, from existing entrepreneurial GPs to social enterprises and corporate independent providers.’ (2)

References

1. Our health, our care, our say: a new direction for community services. (Department of Health, 2006)

2. More family doctor services for deprived areas. (Department of Health press release, 19 March 2007)

 

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